Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Sign in to follow this  
duevolteffe

Luppolo in fase di mash

Recommended Posts

Sto modificando una ricetta per un IPA e ho notato sul web che in molti inseriscono una gittata di luppolo durante il mash. Questa tecnica cosa comporta?

Io di primo acchito ho subito pensato che rafforzi il sapore di luppolo in bocca, oppure che abbia l'effetto di un dryhopping. Ma ovviamente non ne ho idea...qualcuno sa cosa comporta ?

Potrebbe rivelarsi una cosa interessante da provare sulla nuova IPA...la cui ricetta è pronta, ma potrei appunto decidere di aggiungerci un 30g (x 20 litri finali) di luppolo nel mash.

Grazie ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Così a naso, anche se per ora sono tutte chiacchiere e distintivo dubito che possa avere l'effetto di un dryhop:
se ci pensi oltre il mash quello che è stato estratto dal luppolo subirà  anche una forte bollitura e poi la fermentazione.
Dry hop vinene fatto appunto dopo la bollitura per rispettare le essenze del nostro amato luppolo.
Mi verrebbe da pensare più ad una amaricatura non tropo spinta, viste le temeperature e visti i tempi variabili di un mash
Ma per ora ripeto sono tutta teoria, zero pratica.
La parola ai mastri birraioli!

LamSaiWing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Si infatti quella del dryhop penso sia proprio una cavolata...provando ad aggiungere in hobbybrew il luppolo in mash aumentano di pochissimo gli IBU (tipo di 6 con 30g ci citra a 12%AA) quindi l'idea dell'amaricatura leggera ci sta, ma proprio leggerissima...quasi impercettibile. A questo punto immagino che rafforzi il sapore di luppolo sulla birra finita...ma come al solito son solo supposizioni:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Observations on Mash Hopping by Marc Sedam


Every brewer knows when to add hops in the wort. You need some for the long boil to bitter the beer, some between 10-20 minutes from the end of the boil for flavor, and a handful at the end of the boil to get the intoxicating aroma into the beer. The hopheads among us even dry hop beer for that extra something in many pale ales. Oh, and of course you can add hops to the mash.
The mash?

Hops in the mash have a history in brewing. I first came upon this concept while trying to make the ultimate Berliner Weiss. Eric Schneider's article on Berliner Weiss in Brewing Techniques a few years back mentioned that aged leaf hops were often placed in the mash to aid in filtration. My attempt at the recipe came out well, but the concept of adding some hops to the mash was intriguing. What would hops do in the mash? Could you use pellets?

My first mash-hopped brew was a simple lager made using 10 pounds of pilsner malt, two ounces of Hallertauer Hersbrucker in the mash, and an ounce of Bullion in the boil for bittering. The resulting beer was shocking. It had hop aroma and flavor that I'd never been able to get in a beer before. When the beer was warmed up a bit, one whiff put me closer to a hop field than any glass ever before.

I continued to experiment with the amounts of hops to use in the mash, trying to make recipes I knew so I could subjectively predict the bitterness contributed. Pilsners, brown ales, barleywines, and pale ales - all of these styles seemed to benefit from mash hopping. A few postings to the Homebrew Digest ([url]http://www.hbd.org[/url]) led me to Paddock Wood Brewing Supplies, a homebrew shop in Canada run by Stephen Cavan. Little did I know that Stephen had been dabbling in mash hopping as well and had some information up on his website. I began to share what I was doing with other homebrewing web groups and convinced a few people to give it a shot. Many were impressed with the result. Some were not. I encouraged people to write me with their experiences and asked for as much detail on the brewing process as they could remember. Several e-mails were swapped over the next few months and some "best methods" began to emerge.
How do you mash hop?

Not all beers are worth mash hopping. But those beers that are characterized by hop flavor or aroma certainly seem to benefit. My Classic American Pilsner really shines when mash hopped. Others have tried it in a decoction and, other than a slightly increased bittering contribution of the mash hops, enjoyed the results. I have a few simple rules for converting a normally hopped beer to a mash hopped brew:
Replace the amount of late addition flavor and aroma hops with 1.5x the amount of mash hops. For example, if your recipe calls for an ounce of Saaz as a flavor addition and another ounce for the aroma addition, you would add three ounces of Saaz to the mash. Hops are added directly to the mash at dough-in.
Use pellets. I have mash hopped with leaf and with pellets and the pellets give much better results. This could be because the hop oils are more exposed in the pellets through processing.
Add slightly more bittering hops. Current observations indicate that mash hopping provides almost no bitterness to the finished beer. Thus when you move hops from the boil to the mash, you must compensate for the bitterness that is lost. I do this by calculating the IBUs that would have been contributed to the original recipe by the flavor and aroma hops and then increasing the bittering hop addition accordingly.
Sparge, boil, chill, ferment, enjoy! That's it. After adding hops to the mash, the rest of the brewing cycle proceeds as normal. Surprisingly, the hops do not get in the way of lautering. I always start the lauter slowly, but have never had a stuck mash since starting mash hopping.


Why does it work?

The short answer is that I don't know. Traditional beers generate hop flavor and aroma through late hop additions because the volatile oils that provide these properties are driven off in the boil. Mash hopping is targeting the aromatic oils and not the bittering oils. Mash hopped beers have plenty of hop flavor and aroma, yet the wort is boiled for over an hour. My main theory is that the otherwise volatile hop oils are stabilized during extended periods at mashing pH (5.2-5.5). A reason to believe this theory is found in Jean DeClerck's classic Textbook of Brewing (1957). DeClerck states that hop aromatic oils form chemical bonds at higher pH values and lower temps than found in boiling wort. The bonds which are formed are not broken during the boil; hence the permanent aromatic profile. DeClerck even suggested steeping hops in warm water. So the mash provides an attractive temperature and pH profile to allow the hop aromatic oils to form permanent bonds and making them less volatile. Even the eventual boil of the wort isn't enough to drive off the aromas. Again, this is my theory that seems to have a toehold in previous scientific observation. But this is far from the definitive answer.

I have done ten mash-hopped beers and the other feedback I've received gives a sample size of over 50 batches. Most folks report achieving a smoother hop flavor and aroma. In addition, of course, everyone gets less debris in the kettle since the hops are added to the mash and not the boil. This helps to increase wort yield and I've eked out an extra quart of wort on each batch due solely to this effect.

I have received other feedback on mash hopping from personal e-mails and public postings on the HBD. Some people have not seen a great effect from trying the process. Most of these were attributed to using too few hops in the mash. But there are still others who don't have an explanation. Other factors such as water chemistry and mash pH may play a role, but these would require further exploration.
Summary

Mash hopping isn't for every beer and it may not be financially sound for commercial breweries. But home brewers should certainly try the process once to test it out for themselves. As most of what is presented here has come from experimentation by myself and others, I'd be happy to hear about your experiences. I always appreciate feedback from those who have tried it and someday hope to have a mash-hopped beer analyzed for content to empirically determine what's happening.

This article was published on Thursday 12 February, 2004.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
interessante, proverò anche io.
Se col mash-hopping gli olii aromatici si legano fortemente, mi viene in mente una sperimentazione ancora più spinta: aumentare la dose di luppolo in mash e provare a eliminare completamente la gettata ai 20 minuti del boil.
Da confrontare poi con la stessa birra fatta alla maniera classica.

Proverò prima o poi, ma se qualche pazzo vuol fare da cavia prima :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bene, l'articolo è interessantissimo, ed in sintesi afferma che il mash hopping dona forte aroma e sapore di luppolo alla birra. Unico dubbio che mi salta in mente: quando parla di utilizzare la quantità  di luppolo che userebbe per aroma e sapore moltiplicata per 1,5...intende eliminando le gittate in bollitura o mantenendole (e sommarle quindi al mash hopping) ???

In alcune ricette ho visto utilizzare normali gittate in bollitura e una gittata equivalente a 1/1,5 grammi al litro in mash hopping.

Boh credo proprio che appena avrò le idee più chiare tenterò subito...magari il weekend prossimo con una cotta di IPA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dice proprio "replace", ovvero "sostituisci": da quello che ne capisco, si utilizza solo il luppolo da mash hopping e quello da amaro, eliminando quello delle ultime gittate.
E' una cosa che un po' mi spiazza... ci vorrebbe qualcuno che provasse per primo.
Duevolteffe, se ti cimenti, puoi fare un bel report?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Penso che il concetto sia un pò quello del first wort hopping(ovvero quello di sfruttare temperature più basse alla gittata) però nel FW poi il luppolo lo si porta in bollitura quà  no.
Posta i risultai e le impressioni mi raccomando.;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Un po' mi spaventa :D:D[:p] ma tenterò, magari nel pomeriggio scrivo meglio la ricetta e ve la posto, poi se riesco a convincere i soci nel weekend faccio la cotta. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
La ricetta che avevo pensato di fare sarebbe questa...

AMERICAN IPA
Ricetta per , litri finali 20,0 (in bollitura 24,0)
efficienza 75%, bollitura 60 min.
OG 1,065; IBU: 72,4; EBC: 21;
Malti:
5000 gr Maris Otter Pale, 1,038;
300 gr Crystal 105L, 1,033;
250 gr Cara-Pils Dextrine Malt, 1,033;
Luppoli e altro:
20 gr Citra, 12,0 %a.a., 60 min;
20 gr Sorachi ACE, 12,0 %a.a., 60 min;
28 gr Sorachi ACE, 12,0 %a.a., 30 min;
28 gr Citra, 12,0 %a.a., 1 min;

Per fare la ricetta scritta sopra ho utilizzato hobbybrew, che non ha nel database ne citra ne sorachi, quindi li ho creati con una AA 12% (la media di quello che è segnato sul sito del venditore)...

il problema arriva ora in quanto ho provato ad utilizzare oltre ad hobbybrew anche hopville e beertools per confrontare i valori, provando a sostituire le gittate con il luppolo nel mash moltiplicato per 1.5

Hopville e Beertools mi segnalano, variando di poco dalla ricetta originale, sui 60 IBU, mentre in hobbybrew con il mash-hopping schizzano a 120 IBU. A chi devo credere ???:D

Secondo hobbybrew verrebbe così...

AMERICAN IPA CON MASH-HOPPING

Ricetta per , litri finali 20,0 (in bollitura 24,0)
efficienza 75%, bollitura 60 min.
OG 1,065; IBU: 119,0; EBC: 21;
Malti:
5000 gr Maris Otter Pale, 1,038;
300 gr Crystal 105L, 1,033;
250 gr Cara-Pils Dextrine Malt, 1,033;
Luppoli e altro:
20 gr Citra, 12,0 %a.a., 60 min;
20 gr Sorachi ACE, 12,0 %a.a., 60 min;
45 gr Citra, 12,0 %a.a., 60 min;
45 gr Sorachi ACE, 12,0 %a.a., 60 min;

...dove i 45g di citra e sorachi sono quelli che vanno nel mash.

Voi cosa ne pensate della ricetta ? e sopratutto...a chi devo credere? allo sbalzo di IBU di hobbybrew o agli IBU invariati degli altri 2 ? :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote]John Priming ha scritto:
Duevolteffe, se ti cimenti, puoi fare un bel report?
[/quote]

E' un esperimento che volevo provare quest'inverno con una lager, poi ho avuto sempre il frigo impegnato in altre lagerizzazioni, perciò è saltato tutto. Siamo tutti interessati (per lo meno io molto), dal momento che si tratta di una tecnica tradizionale, che i boemi di fine '800 applicavano regolarmente alle loro produzioni (fonte Rasio-Samarani "LA BIRRA" 1906) [:50]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Vero, si parla di replace, avevo letto velocemente e pensavo fosse una aggiunta in più.
Son proprio curioso di provare, mi tocca lavare le pentole, pensavo di aver concluso la stagione per qualche mese.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote]conco ha scritto:

Penso che il concetto sia un pò quello del first wort hopping(ovvero quello di sfruttare temperature più basse alla gittata) però nel FW poi il luppolo lo si porta in bollitura quà  no.
[/quote]

[url]http://www.brewery.org/library/1stwort.html[/url]
qui c'è un articolo sul first wort hopping. in pratica è un confronto di due cotte uguali, con gli stessi luppoli, ma in una delle due cotte una certa percentuale è usata in FWH. il ph più alto facilita l'estrazione di alfa acidi dal luppolo. Il risultato è: più aa isomerizzati e quindi più amaro nel FWH, meno aa non isomerizzati (composti da aroma) nella birra FWH, tuttavia un gusto più gradevole della FWH secondo gli assaggiatori.

io ho fatto due lager con FWH quest'inverno:
Pils con Saaz in FWH (circa 14g in FWH per 23l totali, 45 IBU totali) è risultata ottima, con un amaro più forte rispetto al solito (è una ricetta collaudata che faccio da anni ogni inverno) e nel complesso un aroma e profumi più gradevoli
Lager da 25 IBU con Hersbrucher in FWH (10g su 20 litri): anche qui più amaro, ma la birra lascia un retrogusto amaro poco piacevole e un sentore chimico, non si tratta di fenoli, quindi credo che dipenda proprio dal luppolo messo in FWH

in sostanza penso che fare FWH in birre ad alte IBU dia un miglioramento all'amaro ed anche all'aroma. lo eviterò per birre poco luppolate ma voglio fare una prova di FWH per una bitter con luppoli inglesi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
abbiamo fatto una ordinary bitter con luppoli americani usando il FWH. mi piace molto questa tecnica, dà  un amaro più morbido e più legato. consiglio a tutti di provare :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote]lukeout ha scritto:

abbiamo fatto una ordinary bitter con luppoli americani usando il FWH. mi piace molto questa tecnica, dà  un amaro più morbido e più legato. consiglio a tutti di provare :D
[/quote]

Orca lukeout non farti sentire da Tnt.....:D:D:D
Già  con una bitter con luppoli americani me lo fai adirare....poi con il FWH ti da del gay....ahahahah....ovviamente scherzo.;)
E una tecnica che ho provato anch'io con 2 cotte,non mi ha fatto impazzire,devo riprovarla comunque,forse sono stato troppo conservativo.;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dall'articolo sembrerebbe che la tecnica non apporti IBU apprezzabili, ma sinceramente non capisco come possa essere che del luppolo lasciato in ammollo in liquido caldo non lo amarifichi.

Sarà  sicuramente vero, mah... cmq alla prima cotta provo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote]conco ha scritto:

[quote]lukeout ha scritto:

abbiamo fatto una ordinary bitter con luppoli americani usando il FWH. mi piace molto questa tecnica, dà  un amaro più morbido e più legato. consiglio a tutti di provare :D
[/quote]

Orca lukeout non farti sentire da Tnt.....:D:D:D
Già  con una bitter con luppoli americani me lo fai adirare....poi con il FWH ti da del gay....ahahahah....
[/quote]

ahahahahah!!! si, l'idea era decisamente iconoclasta, ma il risultato è stato ottimo!

cmq non bisogna certo lesinare sui luppoli, andateci pesante!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Domani tento la cotta di IPA con il mash hopping (userò la ricetta che avevo postato sopra) e cerco di fare qualche foto e di portare successivamente un resoconto qui e sul blog. Speriamo bene :D

Non so se farci anche un dry hopping...ancora sono incerto...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Allora...ieri ho fatto la cotta di IPA con il mash-hopping. E' andato tutto bene senza grossi intoppi e la birra sta già  fermentando allegramente.

Ho seguito le indicazioni dell'articolo ed ho mantenuto in bollitura la gittata da amaro e tolto le altre, che ho invece gettato in fase di mash (appena dopo aver amalgamato bene i grani) con la quantità  moltiplicata per 1,5.

Sembrerebbe che i pellets si siano più o meno disciolti nel mash ed è spettacolare l'aroma di luppolo che emana il mosto, davvero molto forte. Il mosto stesso e la schiuma si sono tinti leggermente di verdognolo :).

In fase di sparge non è successo niente di strano, l'unica cosa che ho notato è che il mosto filtrato è più torbido e perde molto dell'aroma di luppolo che lo caratterizzava in precedenza.

Le trebbie in compenso erano un esplosione aromatica di luppolo :D Ho provato ad assaggiarle per vedere se effettivamente il luppolo amaricasse in modo decisivo il mosto, ma nei vari assaggi non ho riscontrato un amaro invadente.

In bollitura si è raccolta sulla superficie un po' di polvere verdognola, probabilmente luppolo scampato dal filtraggio, ma che è sceso a fondo con la classica fondazza durante il raffreddamento.

Niente di particolarmente strano insomma. La tecnica è semplice (se è così che va portata avanti) e non crea grossi problemi (pensavo di avere intoppi nel filtraggio, un mosto molto torbido...ma niente di ecclatante) e per ora non so dire altro. L'aroma (veramente intenso) che sprigionava il mosto durante il mash (affievolito dopo lo sparge) ci ha lasciati con buone speranze. Anche ora in cantina dove la birra fermenta c'è un deciso odore di luppolo...speriamo che vada tutto bene . ;)

Nei prossimi giorni magari carico qualche foto.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...