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Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble

Geepy

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Everything posted by Geepy

  1. Ma oltre a me, velleitario, megavherr, amerikano e ciarly, chi c'era del forum ?
  2. Geepy

    Dark Mild...questa Sconosciuta!

    ed era anche piuttosto amara, ben oltre quello che dice il bjcp
  3. Geepy

    Dark Mild...questa Sconosciuta!

    G.Paolo. Ottimo, ci si becca al MCB.
  4. Geepy

    Dark Mild...questa Sconosciuta!

    ma sei Roberto? ...se si capisco perchè fai una mild
  5. Il Biermaxx non ha la temperatura regolabile.
  6. Geepy

    Consigli/pareri Su Ricette

    Ragà , giuro che è l'ultima ricetta che posto tratta dal libro di Gordon Strong, a meno che non mi venga esplicimente richiesto. Si tratta di una American Strong Ale interessante per l'utilizzo di un malto "macerato" nell'alcol. FOUR SEAS IPA This was my first IPA (batch #15, brewed in 1997), and was inspired by Sierra Nevada Celebration. It won best of show at the Over the Mill competition in Michigan, where the grand prize was a custom kegerator. Somehow I stuffed it into the passenger seat of my Dodge Stealth and drove it back to Ohio, grinning all the way while hoping I didn’t get pulled over. Style: American Strong Ale (New BJCP Style) Description: Darker and richer than today’s IPAs, this was an American-style IPA at the time. Now it’s probably more like an American Strong Ale or a big red ale. I was working on a new dark malt steeping technique to give it a reddish color. More of a drinking beer than a competition beer now, but useful to compare to more modern recipes. Batch Size: 5 gallons (19 L) OG: 1.072 FG: 1.020 Efficiency: 70% ABV: 6.9% IBU: 90 SRM: 12 Ingredients: 12 lb (5.4 kg) US two-row (Briess) Mash 1 lb (454 g) German Munich (Durst) Mash 2 oz (57 g) Wheat malt (Durst) Mash 8 oz (340 g) Belgian Caravienne Vorlauf 4 oz (113 g) UK Crystal 65 (Crisp) Vorlauf 1 oz (28 g) UK Roasted barley Strike Water (*) 1 oz (28 g) US Chinook 13.5% whole @ 60 1 oz (28 g) US Centennial 10.7% whole @ 15 1 oz (28 g) US Columbus 13.9% whole @ 10 1 oz (28 g) US Centennial 10.7% whole @ 5 0.5 oz (14 g) US Cascade 5.8% whole @ 5 1 oz (28 g) US Columbus 13.9% whole @ 1 1 oz (28 g) US Cascade 5.8% whole @ 0 1 oz (28 g) US Cascade 5.8% whole @ +10 2 oz (57 g) US Cascade 5.8% whole dry hop Wyeast 1028 London Ale yeast Water treatment: RO water treated with ¼ tsp 10% phosphoric acid per 5 gallons 1 tsp CaSO4 in mash (*) Steep roasted barley in heated brewing liquor (entire volume of water to be used in the recipe) until it has a deep reddish hue, then remove. Mash technique: Infusion, mashout, crystal malts added at vorlauf Mash rests: 151°F (66°C) 60 minutes 168°F (76°C) 15 minutes Kettle volume: 6.5 gallons (25 L) Boil length: 60 minutes Final volume: 5 gallons (19 L) Fermentation temp: 68°F (20°C) Sensory Description: Deep reddish copper color, but clear. Great, fresh hop aroma with citrusy and piney notes backed up with a light caramel malt richness. Quite bitter, but with a full finish and clean malty richness to balance. Not as dry and crisp as modern IPAs, but the combination of hops and malt work together very nicely. It won best of show when it was seven months old, so this IPA does take some time to age since the IBUs are quite high. Formulation notes: The goal was to get a reddish color and feature classic old-school American hops (the ‘C’ hops, which leads to the play-on-words recipe name). A more modern combination of hops would certainly work, but I always like to return to some classics to keep perspective. Since this is inspired by Sierra Nevada, try to use fresh whole hops like they do. This does have some crystal malt, which is often frowned on today’s IPAs, but think of it more of a winter IPA; the Munich malt adds a malty backbone without as much sweetness as crystal malt. This recipe is so old, I originally made it as a mini-mash beer (use 9.9 lb of pale liquid extract instead of the two-row), but like it enough that it’s now in my regular rotation. In my older IPAs, I hop the beers heavily and age them for a considerable amount of time, which is more in the British tradition (and lets the bitterness mellow). Contrast this with some of the more modern turn-and-burn recipes, like the “Modern IPA†recipe. Variations: Modern malts give more choices for reddish colors, so you can explore some. I discovered that most crystal malts really gave more amber-brown colors than true copper-red colors, so I decided to see if small amounts of a very dark grain or malt could give the red color (you can literally watch the red color come out of the roasted barley as it steeps). You are looking for color, not flavor, so don’t overdo it. Carafa III Special might work as well.
  7. Geepy

    Discussione Ricette In Programma

    Chiaramente è solo uno spunto. Anch'io molte volte parto da una ricetta su un libro e poi la modifico con le materie prime che ho disponibili in quel momento. I tempi di mash sono pensati per un all-grain classico, quindi il mash out lo puoi evitare. Il protein rest, se usi il malto pils, è bene farlo (io lo faccio sempre), per il resto il tempo totale è sempre quello, ma -volendo- si può fare un mash unico, medio, sui 64°C Una cosa: fai lavoro quel lievito (l'ex abbaye), al di sotto dei 20°C
  8. Geepy

    Discussione Ricette In Programma

    Domiz anche a te propongo una ricette dal libro di Gordon Strong "Modern homebrew recipes" ALISON Remember how I said I sometimes name beers after people who do something memorable when drinking the beer? At a work party at my wife’s office, Alison took a liking to this beer but didn’t fully grasp how strong it was. Among the more amusing things she did later was arm-wrestle the (male) host of the party and win. I like to think the beer had something to do with it, although her impressive biceps may have also been a factor. Style: Belgian Tripel (Classic BJCP Style) Description: A classic tripel in the style of Westmalle Tripel. Dry, bitter, and strong with a spicy and hoppy nose. Highly carbonated, and dangerously drinkable. Could lead to demonstrations of feats of strength. Should probably be saved for Festivus. Batch Size: 6.5 gallons (25 L) OG: 1.080 FG: 1.010 Efficiency: 60% ABV: 9.4% IBU: 36 SRM: 4 Ingredients: 15 lb (6.8 kg) Belgian Pils malt (Dingemans) Mash 4 lb (1.8 kg) White beet sugar Boil 1.5 oz (42 g) US Sterling 7% pellets @ 60 1 oz (28 g) US Sterling 7% pellets @ 15 1 oz (28 g) Styrian Goldings 4.5% pellets @ 2 Wyeast 3787 Trappist Ale yeast Water treatment: RO water treated with ¼ tsp 10% phosphoric acid per 5 gallons 0.5 tsp CaCl2 and 0.5 tsp CaSO4 in mash Mash technique: Step infusion, mashout, no sparge Mash rests: 131°F (55°C) 10 minutes 140°F (60°C) 10 minutes 145°F (63°C) 40 minutes 158°F (70°C) 20 minutes 168°F (76°C) 10 minutes Kettle volume: 8 gallons (30 L) Boil length: 75 minutes Final volume: 6.5 gallons (25 L) Fermentation temp: 68°F (20°C) Sensory description: Delicious Pils malt flavor with a dry finish and high carbonation. The hops also add fruity, spicy, and floral notes, and complement the yeast nicely. The yeast strain produces a peppery, spicy, and fruity quality. Formulation notes: I used Sterling hops instead of the more traditional Saaz, since they often seem fresher at my local homebrew shop and their AA% is higher which means adding less vegetal content to the boil. If you can get fresh Czech Saaz, they are wonderful in this beer. Step mash and add sugar for attenuation. The best tripels start low and finish low so they have the right dryness. The same attenuation won’t taste the same if the FG is too high. You can drop the OG (and the FG) even lower if you think this finishes too big (it’s a little higher than a Westmalle) by cutting out a pound or two of the Pilsner malt while keeping the sugar the same. Using the round-trip mash program in Tom Fitzpatrick’s Last Saison recipe in Chapter 10 could also give you a lower FG. Variations: I provided a more modern tripel recipe in Brewing Better Beer, in the style of La Rulles Tripel. This same beer will taste different with other yeast strains, or fermented at different temperatures. My second favorite is White Labs WLP510 Bastogne. If you want to be a hipster, you can add an ounce or two of debittered black malt in the mashout and create a Black Tripel (that’s a joke …). You can also dry hop the beer more to be more like an IPA. The style also lends itself to being fermented with Brett Brux Trois (White Labs WLP644) as the primary yeast strain, which produces a very dry and fruity beer. Finishing the original beer with Brett Bruxellensis (like White Labs WLP650) will give it more of an Orval feeling (if you want to go that route, swap the primary yeast for White Labs WLP510 Bastogne yeast).
  9. Geepy

    Discussione Ricette In Programma

    Quello dipende dal funzionamento di Beersmith. Quei dati non puoi popolarli prima, devi necessariamente "aspettare" la fine della cotta per averli attendibili
  10. Geepy

    Ricetta Tripel Ipa

    Non a caso l'autore del libro è anche uno dei "redattori" del bcjp
  11. Geepy

    Ricetta Tripel Ipa

    Il simcoe in amaro è il massimo dello spreco
  12. Geepy

    Ricetta Tripel Ipa

    http://beersmith.com/blog/2011/11/17/brewing-beer-with-dark-grains-steeping-versus-mashing/
  13. Geepy

    Ricetta Tripel Ipa

    Oggi sono buono. Ti omaggio di questa ricetta presa dal libro "Modern homebrew recipes" (2015) di Gordon Strong. BELGIAN IPA My good friend Frank Barickman helped me develop this recipe. He does a collaboration brew with Eric Bean of the Columbus Brewing Company, and they call their beer “Big Frank.†It’s a Belgian Double IPA, but I have scaled it a bit and made some hop and yeast substitutions to fit my taste. When I make the standard-strength version, I like to call it “Little Frank†in his honor. Once I made it, I got very good efficiency and it finished unexpectedly low (not a bad thing for a Belgian IPA) winding up quite close to double IPA in strength (OG 1.070, FG 1.005, ABV 8.9%, IBU 42), but deceptively smooth (just like the best Belgian ales). Style: Specialty IPA (New BJCP Style) Description: Like a tripel combined with a modern American fruity and tropical IPA. Batch Size: 6.5 gallons (25 L) OG: 1.064 FG: 1.009 Efficiency: 70% ABV: 7.3% IBU: 56 SRM: 5 Ingredients: 8.5 lb (3.9 kg) Belgian Pilsner malt (Dingeman) Mash 3 lb (1.4 kg) German Vienna malt (Weyermann) Mash 12 oz (340 g) Aromatic malt (Dingeman) Mash 2 lb (907 g) White beet sugar Boil 2 oz (57 g) German Tettnanger 4.5% pellets FWH 1 oz (28 g) Styrian Goldings 2.1% whole @ 15 1 oz (28 g) US Amarillo 9.2% pellets @ 10 1 oz (28 g) Styrian Goldings 2.1% whole @ 5 1 oz (28 g) US Amarillo 9.2% pellets @ 0 1 oz (28 g) US Citra 13.9% pellets @ +10 1 oz (28 g) Australian Galaxy 15% pellets @ +10 2 oz (57 g) US Amarillo 9.2% pellets dry hop White Labs WLP510 Bastogne ale yeast Water treatment: RO water treated with ¼ tsp 10% phosphoric acid per 5 gallons 1 tsp CaCl2 in mash Mash technique: Infusion, mashout, dark grains added at vorlauf Mash rests: 149°F (65°C) 60 minutes 168°F (76°C) 5 minutes Kettle volume: 9 gallons (34 L) Boil length: 120 minutes Final volume: 6.5 gallons (25 L) Fermentation temp: 62°F (17°C), allowing to rise to 75°F (24°C) to finish Sensory Description: Huge apricot character with light pine background, dry finish, light phenols, and strong bitterness. The alcohol needs a little time to age, especially in the double IPA version. Medium body, fairly clean for a Belgian beer. The bitterness is strong but very clean; not harsh at all. Formulation notes: I like the WLP510 Bastogne yeast (same as Orval), but Frank thinks that Wyeast 3787 Trappist Ale yeast does better in competitions since it gives it a more prominent Belgian yeast character. I think that bigger yeast character can clash with the hops, so be careful. I love the combination of Amarillo hops with the Bastogne yeast; it’s something that I’ve seen done commercially in the La Rulles Tripel. Hops that are fruity (particularly tropical or stone fruit) work best. Highly citrus versions would tend to clash with yeast-derived phenols. Frank recommends not substituting out the Tettnanger hops, as they provide a nice floral spiciness. The hop techniques give a very clean bitterness without harshness. I think astringency could kill a beer like this. The yeast is a bit powdery, so I found it necessary to cold crash the yeast at near freezing after it had been warm conditioning for two weeks, which worked wonders, as the beer was incredibly bright afterwards. Additional cold conditioning can smooth out the beer quite well. Variations: Obviously I’ve shown that it can work as a single IPA or a double IPA. When in the double IPA format, I found that it was like a very fresh Westmalle Tripel with a huge hop character. I don’t know that I’d play around with this too much, except maybe to vary the fruity hops a bit or possibly increase the malt complexity and body. Add some flaked oats (maybe 5% of the grist) for something more inspired by Tripel Karmeliet. Possibly also play around with light spicing, adding a dash of coriander (perhaps a third of an ounce or about 10g).
  14. Geepy

    Lista Della Spesa Impianto Biab

    Per quanto riguarda la sacca del venditore italiano su ebay, ti posso confermare che il fondo è cilindrico.
  15. Si Inviato dal mio ALCATEL ONE TOUCH 6010D utilizzando Tapatalk
  16. Eccomi Si, scelta mia, anche perchè le bombolette di co2 durano poco. E si lo spillatore funziona bene.
  17. Si, io, ma in questa versione http://www.amazon.it/TV-Original-Spillatore-risultato-Warentest/dp/B000F7H0YW Sostituito il sistema della cartucce con una bombola CO2 esterna. Funziona con i normali fusti da 5 litri abbastanza bene.
  18. Certo che volete sempre la pappa pronta: http://www.amazon.it/gp/product/B00H0BHA50/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=3370&creative=23322&creativeASIN=B00H0BHA50&linkCode=as2&tag=areabirra-21
  19. Tra i due sceglierei il terzo, ovvero: http://www.amazon.it/Adwa-Ad12-Ph-C-Waterproof/dp/B00FORSLAA/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1448962431&sr=8-6&keywords=phmetro Io ce l'ho e va più che bene.
  20. Mulino per macinare a dischi Corona by Brewferm, in ghisa. Molto robusto, facilmente regolabile tramite vite anteriore, capacità fino a 30 kg/ora. Eventuale base in legno e metallo/plastica regolabile in estensione. Vendo a 50€ + s.s. (senza base), 70€ con la base.
  21. Mega dalle tue parti (+ o -) c'è un ottimo (per me) birrificio che vende le sue birre a 6/7€ il litro!
  22. Ribasso a 45€ +s.s. oppure 50€ spedito.
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